BizTalk, Maintenance

Cleanup BizTalk Servers MgmtDb

I’ve previously blogged about cleaning (emptying) the MsgBox database, something that can be useful in some scenarios, like development and test. While looking for something else the other day I found information about an equally useful procedure, again mainly in an development environment. Speaking for myself I can say that there has been a number of time where I have just wanted to start from a clean slate with my development BizTalk Server installation. Just remove all ports and other deployed artifacts and start from a clean slate. Do NOT run this in production, and be careful that this is REALLY what you want even when running it in another environment.


According to the documentation:
In the BizTalk Management (BizTalkMgmtDb) database, there’s a stored procedure named dbo.adm_cleanupmgmtdb. If you do run this stored procedure, all the entries in the database will be deleted.


It was documented in this article, which wasn’t really on topic with the other content of the page: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa561960.aspx


Nostalgic off-topic link: For some reason I always come to think about the starting sequence for “Anslagstavlan” when talking about clean slates. This link is completely irrelevant to BizTalk, it’s swedish television from the 80’s.

Configuration, General, Maintenance, Monitoring

Event log service is unavailable issue

I thought I’d blog about this issue I had, since it was in the end so easy to solve, but I had a hard time finding a good description of both my specific problem and any resolution. I am a bit ashamed to say that I got quite creative before trying this.


The problem I was having was that when opening the Event Viewer on my Windows Server 2008 I’d got a message saying that “The Event Log service is unavailable. Verify the service is running.“. And if I went to look it was in fact not running. The thing is though that I could easily start it, and it would keep running, until I went to the Event Viewer to look at the logs, which would then bring it down.


I solved this by simply deleting all the files in the C:WindowsSystem32winevtLogs folder.


Update 2010-02-22: Feedback in comments suggest that you might need to restart after performing this step.  


I’m not going to patent the solution, or make the claim that it will work in every case, but it did for me, and if you are experiencing this problem it’s easy enough to try.

Administration, BizTalk, Databases, Maintenance

BizTalk database sizing statistics

In the hope that this might help someone who is tasked to estimate the size of BizTalk Server 2006 databases, I’m offering a few statistics.


These statistics comes from an engagement that uses very few orchestrations and more or less does messaging only – ie do all the work in pipeline components and/or maps. Just to give you a hint of the volumes we are talking about – here are some numbers from the beginning of May:








































AvgRecvKB


AvgSndKB


Count


Month


Day


812 


7274 


476 


5


1


479


4111


1130


5


2


970


10877


444


5


3


680


10328


357


5


4


443


3288


1114


5


5


Now we have only been doing the volumes specified in the above table for roughly two months, before that is has been smaller but incrementally increasing (it would too drawn out to give the full story). I know that gives you a somewhat incomplete background, but that’s just how it is. Here are the sizes of the base BizTalk Server databases (all figures are in MB).


































Database


Data


Log


Total


Free


BAMPrimaryImport


655


380


1034


637


BizTalkMgmtDb


46


43


87


44


BizTalkMsgBoxDb


253


556


807


758


SSODB


13


13


25


15


I guess I should also mention that we have the BizTalk backup jobs doing full backups on a daily basis, as well as trasaction log backups every 20 minutes, and the DTA purge and archive setup for 12 live hours and 7 hard days. We have roughly about 300 receive ports, 1000 receive locations and 400 send ports and 20 or so orchestrations. Regular BizTalk Tracking hasn’t been globally turned off, but is at a basic minimum. A BAM Tracking component does the real tracking as far as monitoring goes.


Do you have any statistics that you could perhaps share with me?

Administration, BizTalk, Configuration, Learning, Maintenance, Monitoring, Readings

BizTalk Administration Tutorials

This post is for those of you who are administrators rather then developers, and don’t keep track of the latest downloads around BizTalk. Microsoft has, at the same time that they released a revised version of the developer centric tutorials, released BizTalk Server 2006 Adminstration Tutorials. The administration tutorials are planned to become two, although at the moment only one is available. The first part is setting up the environment, in this case a slightly altered version of what is available in the multi-server scenario of the installation guides adding on an ISA Server to be able to create the environment separate from your corporate network. The tutorials also describes how to setup this environment using Virtual Server 2005 R2 (although physical hardware is also mentioned) and goes much more in depth to make it a compelling learning experience, as opposed to the install guide that can sometimes be hard to follow for a first timer. The first tutorial weighs in at 138 pages (double the size of the install guide), not counting the supporting documents. The second part is supposed to feature common administrative exercises based on the environment setup in part 1. If your are to familiarize youself with BizTalk Server 2006 as an administrator, from what I’ve seen, I’d recommend these tutorials.

Configuration, Maintenance, WCF

WCF issue after installing updates

After installing updates this past night our webservers began exhibiting odd behaviour. All our Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) services began returning 405 Method Not Allowed. I’m not sure which patch was responsible for causing this, but I strongly dislike it when applying updates change my configuration. When I tried to access the svc file directly from a browser I got a 404. This led me to check the .svc mapping. Don’t ask me why, but as it turns out this mapping had been removed. Adding it back solved the problem. I haven’t tracked it down, and I don’t think I will, but the culprit is most likely part of either Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 Service Pack 1 (KB110806) or Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 Service Pack 1 (KB929300). The other updates installed can almost certainly be disregarded.