Conference, General, PDC

Preparing for PDC 09






I’ll be there. I’m happy about it. The sessions looks promising, although I have to say that the functionality of the website as far as scheduling goes really blows. There it no way to visualize your schedule, and no way to export it to your outlook calendar or even to something like Excel. That I’ve found to this date.


There are three sessions awarded with the BizTalk keyword (listed in my order or interest):


Microsoft BizTalk Server Futures and Roadmap


Learn how BizTalk Server 2009 lets you focus on writing the code to do the hardcore business logic and let BizTalk take care of moving the data. Hear how your development skills with Windows Communication Foundation (WCF), and Windows Workflow Foundation (WF) work seamlessly with the powerful integration platform of BizTalk. Find out how BizTalk aligns with the Microsoft application server in the longer term.


Queuing and Publish/Subscribe in a Heterogeneous Environment


Queuing and publish/subscribe are common patterns for building loosely-coupled, distributed applications. Learn how to use Microsoft Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) the new Microsoft ASP.NET 4.0 routing service, the Microsoft .NET Service Bus, and Microsoft BizTalk Server to easily connect heterogeneous systems. We then introduce AMQP (the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol), an important new open standard for interoperable message-oriented middleware, which will reduce the friction in connecting heterogeneous clients. A real-world scenario shows AMQP in action, connecting WCF, Microsoft Excel, and Java-based clients.


Connecting Applications with the Microsoft BizTalk Enterprise Service Bus


See how the BizTalk Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) enables you to build services that can be quickly located and connected, whether they live behind the firewall or in the cloud, without creating a brittle point-to-point link. Learn how to dramatically improve the service lifecycle of development, testing, and deployment by using the powerful messaging, routing, and transformation capabilities of the BizTalk ESB in your solution today, and get a glimpse of future plans for BizTalk service bus/pub-sub pattern


The team talks about the upcomming BizTalk content at PDC09 here.

Conference, PDC, Presentation

PDC08 Review presentation notes

Thank you to those who came and watched the PDC08 Review presentation that we did. The presentation slide deck will be sent out through email this time instead of being posted here, since as I mentioned it’s made up of 60-70% recycled slides from the PDC slide-decks, and I don’t want to distribute that from this site. Instead of using my sample code to get started I urge you too look at the links to the most important video for that topic as well as the links provided to whitepapers, SDK’s and toolkits throughout the presentation. If you have any questions feel free to call or drop me a line.

PDC

My three favorite PDC08 Sessions

PDC08… It happened, I was there, and now it’s over. I’ve been watching some of the sessions that I didn’t catch, some of the ones I did just to see what I missed, as well as some additional related content published by channel9 and other people within the community. I was challenged though to name my Top 3 PDC sessions, out of them all. Now, that’s hard. You almost have to put it in context. The context I’m giving it is: “What if I am a developer or an architect and want to quickly get an overview of what this Azure, Oslo, Dublin is?”. Dublin, some might argue, is not a big a thing as the others, but seeing that I do alot of BizTalk development and architecture I really thought the session was one of my favorites. It also shows of the new WCF/WF 4.0 features, so you kind of get two in one there. So these are my three favorite sessions:




  • TL23 – A lap around Oslo (Doug Purdy)


  • BB18 – “Dublin”: Hosting and Managing Workflows and Services in Windows Application Server (Dan Eshner)


  • ES01 – Developing and deploying your first cloud service (Steve Marx)

The best way to get a hold of these that I know of is to go to the microsoftpdc site and download them of of there.

Administration, BizTalk, Conference, PDC

A BizTalk Developers approach to Dublin

Relax. Grab a beer (a Guiness perhaps). Dublin, the application server role extension to WAS/IIS, is to be released roughly three months after Visual Studio 2010, so somewhere around 1,5-2 years from now. There is still time to come to grips with it. Even so… Although purposefully and overly simplified from the technological aspect from the visual aspect Dublin looks like the BizTalk Admin Console. It acts the same. The terms used are the same. There the queries for messages, there are Active instances (Running or Ready to Run), there are Suspended instances – which you can resume or terminate, there is context based routing, it imports and exports applications easily etc. But Dublin is of course much more then a user interface. When you dive down into it, it seperates itself through a number of things. Read more at Charles Youngs post here. But BizTalk developers, don’t worry, you’ll quickly feel at home.

Conference, PDC, WCF

PDC Pre-Con – WCF

PDC Pre-con


Conference Tip #1: A Pre-Con is an introduction. At least the first part of the pre-con will be taking it from the beginning. Don’t be dissapointed if you feel you know all the stuff they say during the first hour or two.


Conference Tip #2: Don’t leave after the first hour or two. It will get more interesting.


WCF Pre-Con session


I’ve heard Juval Löwy of IDesign talk about WCF in the past. In fact I’ve even read his book (Programming WCF Services), now being sent to the presses for a 2nd edition. It is a comprehensive thing that gives a good introduction to WCF as well as introduces patterns and re-usable code for working with it. In a video recorded on Channel9 I’ve heard Juval say that everything should be a service. At the time I thought that sounded slightly crazy. This time the message was that the introduction of WCF is the same kind of semantic shift from .NET development as .NET was from VB or C++ and C++ was from C. Syntax is the small part, sematics is everything really. Overall what WCF gives us is a proven library of best practices and guidelines available out of the box. After an entire day he had has me convinced, of both of the points above. Now, I’m not saying that all classes should be a service and all methods a service call, but I definatly can tell you that I can see the advantages of such a situation after a full days worth of hammering it in by Juval.


It’s really all about the glue. Research has shown that as much as 95% of time is spent buidling, maintaining and troubleshooting glue code. That only leaveas 5% for doing the real stuff, the stuff that you are really getting payed for. WCF is out-of-the-box glue. All that security, transactional support, serialization, versioning etc etc that you’d want your application to have, without you having to spend any time on developing it. A sweet deal really.